US edition of the world's oldest magazine

Bill Kauffman

American Life

A day in DC

The Jefferson Memorial still gives off a far better vibe than the Potomac anthills in which the self-important Get Things Done

By Bill Kauffman

American Life

Six degrees of Batavia

I guess I’m just two degrees removed from Lime Jell-O fruit salad

By Bill Kauffman

American Life

A eulogy for the Democrats of yore

Remember the last invigorating spasm before the body of the party achieved corpsehood?

By Bill Kauffman

American Life

Hoosiers of New York

On a March day in 1991, I watched a bittersweet rural New York version of ‘Hoosiers’ play out

By Bill Kauffman

American Life

Rum, Rome and rebellion

Men and women of the working class, Catholic or not, are arraigned by progressive yappers for being socially retrograde

By Bill Kauffman

Home

Mark Twain in Buffalo

Mark Twain would be hopelessly out of favor with both wings of the modern duopoly

By Bill Kauffman

Home

Blues for Jimmy Duncan

Jimmy Duncan is a man who knows his place, which is one of the highest compliments I can give

By Bill Kauffman

Home

I was on the floor in ’74

It’s hard to believe, but New York was a competitive state then

By Bill Kauffman

Sports

What’s in a name?

I pour myself a tumbler of rotgut and settle in with the names, these glorious names

By Bill Kauffman

Home

Rules for anarchists

American anarchism has always been a literary conceit more than a political (or anti-political) program

By Bill Kauffman

Home

Coffee with Coleen

Few if any breakfasts equal those I’ve consumed at Coleen’s Kitchen

By Bill Kauffman

Home

In the footsteps of Shoeless Joe

Greenville’s favorite son is the poetically tragic Shoeless Joe Jackson, the illiterate millhand whom Babe Ruth called ‘the greatest hitter I had ever seen’

By Bill Kauffman

Home

Thelonious Monk deserves the last note

The mural painted on my envisioned Thelonious Monk Alley would feature images of little Thelonious in his fireman’s cap, surrounded by firemen, and the adult Thelonious at the piano

By Bill Kauffman

Home

What is true in life is true in baseball is true in politics

A circuit that was born in Batavia in 1939 died in Manhattan’s oppressive Time-Life Building

By Bill Kauffman

Home

Books you shouldn’t read in public

To read is to invite derision, especially if you grew up in a working-class town

By Bill Kauffman

more writers

Stay informed

Thought-provoking commentary and opinion on politics, books and the arts.

Web-only content Copyright © 2021 The Spectator // Magazine content Copyright © 2021 The Spectator