The New York Times, the newspaper best known for attempting to rewrite the start-date of American history, mass revolts over publishing op-eds by sitting US senators and Brit-bashing Anglophobia, is embroiled in something close to civil war. The casus belli of this? A directive from on high that the paper's hard-of-thinking hacks return to the office part-time, now that Covid has banished to the history books.

Unfortunately, not all at the "Gray Lady" seem too pleased with this development. The paper's local rival reports that more than 1,300 journalists have signed a valiant pledge not to return...

The New York Times, the newspaper best known for attempting to rewrite the start-date of American history, mass revolts over publishing op-eds by sitting US senators and Brit-bashing Anglophobia, is embroiled in something close to civil war. The casus belli of this? A directive from on high that the paper’s hard-of-thinking hacks return to the office part-time, now that Covid has banished to the history books.

Unfortunately, not all at the “Gray Lady” seem too pleased with this development. The paper’s local rival reports that more than 1,300 journalists have signed a valiant pledge not to return to the office, even though bosses expect staff in only three days a week. It’s the latest flashpoint in an increasingly bitter row about wages. One disgruntled employee moaned that commuting during a “period of high inflation” meant workers being forced to spend more money on gas, mass transit, clothing and lunches, despite the lack of salary increases.

And given their paper’s famed tact and sensitivity, it’s no surprise that the NYT‘s management have responded by only making the situation worse: tacky branded lunchboxes. NYT video journalist Haley Willis tweeted today: “The @nytimes is giving employees branded lunch boxes this week as a return-to-office perk. We want respect and a fair contract instead.”

All this, at a time when remuneration at the top is soaring. The publisher of the Times A.G. Sulzberger pulled in a total package of $3.6 million in 2021 compared to $2.4 million in 2020 and his colleague CEO Meredith Kopt Levien saw hers go up from $4.4 million to $5.8 million over the same period. Kerching!

Couldn’t happen to a nicer newspaper, eh?

This article was originally published on The Spectator’s UK website.