It seems to be harder to donate money to the Canadian truckers protesting their country's vaccine mandate than it is to keep Hunter Biden out of a strip club. After GoFundMe seized millions of dollars raised on its platform for the Freedom Convoy, Christian crowdfunding site GiveSendGo stepped in and enabled donors to give nearly $10 million.

GiveSendGo was promptly hacked and the personal information of 93,000 donors to the Freedom Convoy released to the public. The media — who largely resisted touching the Hunter Biden laptop story because it allegedly contained "hacked" information — jumped...

It seems to be harder to donate money to the Canadian truckers protesting their country’s vaccine mandate than it is to keep Hunter Biden out of a strip club. After GoFundMe seized millions of dollars raised on its platform for the Freedom Convoy, Christian crowdfunding site GiveSendGo stepped in and enabled donors to give nearly $10 million.

GiveSendGo was promptly hacked and the personal information of 93,000 donors to the Freedom Convoy released to the public. The media — who largely resisted touching the Hunter Biden laptop story because it allegedly contained “hacked” information — jumped on the opportunity to shame and harass private citizens for donating to causes of which they don’t approve.

An Ottawa gelato shop has already closed over violent threats after the owner’s name was listed in the hacked donor list. No good could come from further publicizing donors. Still, Washington Post reporters started reaching out to names on the list to demand they explain their actions.

“Your name and email address are associated with a $40 contribution,” an email from a Post reporter to a donor reads. “Could you please… share what motivated you to contribute to the campaign?”

Reporters will try to claim that this is just routine journalism — but we weren’t born yesterday. We see the baited hook behind these questions and the harassment they will bring onto private citizens. Even Representative Ilhan Omar condemned the practice, tweeting, “I fail to see why any journalist felt the need to report on a shop owner making such a insignificant donation.”

The attacks on Freedom Convoy fundraisers are happening at the same time that Black Lives Matter Louisville and the Louisville Community Bail Fund paid $100,000 to release an alleged attempted political assassin. Quintez Brown, a BLM activist who appeared on MSNBC lobbying for gun control and was invited to the a national gathering for the Obama Foundation’s My Brother’s Keeper Alliance, is accused of firing multiple gunshots at a Jewish Democratic mayoral candidate earlier this week.

Few national outlets have covered the shooting. As far as I can tell, none have scrutinized how BLM raised the $100,000 bail to spring Brown from jail. (Some have even blamed right-wingers for the attempted murder.) Similarly, it didn’t seem many news outlets clamored to know who was donating to the Minneapolis Freedom Fund that allowed for the release of rioters and alleged rapists, domestic abusers and cop killers. Oh, and remember how quickly the press stopped talking about the Waukesha Christmas parade massacre when we found out that the two-decade career criminal accused of running over dozens of people had been released on a mere $1,000 bail?

Pointing out hypocrisy is sometimes a funny exercise, but it’s downright disturbing when it reveals deep-rooted injustice. People with the “correct” political opinions or “right” ethnicity can get away with just about anything. Everyone else faces the wrath of government forces, the media and Big Tech companies who collude to deny access to society and erode civil rights. This double standard is no joke and promises a long and difficult fight ahead for anyone challenging those with real social and political capital.