Cockburn joins the rest of the world in mourning the good Queen Elizabeth II, a stalwart figure of grace and warmth who endured much during her long life and seventy-five-year reign — often, incredibly, with an impish twinkle in her eye.

The Queen worked as a truck mechanic during World War II, served alongside fifteen prime ministers, including Winston Churchill, lived through fourteen US presidencies, and weathered the marriage scandals of Princess Diana and Prince Charles, the heartache of Diana’s tragic death, Meghan Markle’s endless attention-seeking antics, and an exhausting schedule of public appearances.

It's no wonder...

Cockburn joins the rest of the world in mourning the good Queen Elizabeth II, a stalwart figure of grace and warmth who endured much during her long life and seventy-five-year reign — often, incredibly, with an impish twinkle in her eye.

The Queen worked as a truck mechanic during World War II, served alongside fifteen prime ministers, including Winston Churchill, lived through fourteen US presidencies, and weathered the marriage scandals of Princess Diana and Prince Charles, the heartache of Diana’s tragic death, Meghan Markle’s endless attention-seeking antics, and an exhausting schedule of public appearances.

It’s no wonder the woman liked to enjoy a drink — or four?

It was reported in 2017 that the Queen regularly partook of a midmorning glass of gin and Dubonnet on the rocks with a slice of lemon, a glass of wine with lunch, a dry martini at dinner, and some fine Champagne before bed.

Shortly after the initial story appeared, however, former royal chef Darren McGrady denied that the Queen drank that much, blaming the supposedly daily list on “journalists not understanding his accent.”

Town & Country noted, though, that “the Queen’s cousin, Margaret Rhodes, told The Independent, “[Elizabeth’s] drink preferences never change.”

Whatever the case, Cockburn can’t help but notice that every time someone lives a nice, long life, he or she gives alcohol some of the credit. Remember Richard Overton, the World War II veteran who lived to be 112 years old? He had cigars, whiskey, and ice cream every day. Or how about Olive Netting, who, when she turned 100, had a Guinness-themed party, because she credited her good health to “drinking a glass of Guinness every day for about the last seventy years”?

Cockburn may be biased, but there’s proof that alcohol reduces stress. So in loving memory of Queen Elizabeth II, let us raise a glass to our beloved late monarch. Whatever her daily regimen, or ours, may we continue her legacy of kindness, humor, and good spirits.